The Boleyn Women: The Tudor Femmes Fatales Who Changed English History

The Boleyn Women The Tudor Femmes Fatales Who Changed English History The Boleyn family appeared from nowhere at the end of the fourteenth century moving from peasant to princess in only a few generations The women of the family brought about its advancement beginning

  • Title: The Boleyn Women: The Tudor Femmes Fatales Who Changed English History
  • Author: Elizabeth Norton
  • ISBN: 9781848689886
  • Page: 217
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Boleyn family appeared from nowhere at the end of the fourteenth century, moving from peasant to princess in only a few generations The women of the family brought about its advancement, beginning with the heiresses Alice Bracton Boleyn, Anne Hoo Boleyn and Margaret Butler Boleyn who brought wealth and aristocratic connections Then there was Elizabeth Howard Boleyn,The Boleyn family appeared from nowhere at the end of the fourteenth century, moving from peasant to princess in only a few generations The women of the family brought about its advancement, beginning with the heiresses Alice Bracton Boleyn, Anne Hoo Boleyn and Margaret Butler Boleyn who brought wealth and aristocratic connections Then there was Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, who was rud to have been the mistress of Henry VIII, along with her daughter Mary and niece Madge, who certainly were Anne Boleyn became the king s second wife and her aunts, Lady Boleyn and Lady Shelton, helped bring her to the block The infamous Jane Boleyn, the last of her generation, betrayed her husband before dying on the scaffold with Queen Catherine Howard.The next generation was no less turbulent and Catherine Carey, the daughter of Mary Boleyn fled from England to avoid persecution under Mary Tudor Her daughter, Lettice was locked in bitter rivalry with the greatest Boleyn lady of all, Elizabeth I, winning the battle for the affections of Robert Dudley but losing her position in society as a consequence Finally, another Catherine Carey, the Countess of Nottingham, was so close to her cousin, the queen, that Elizabeth died of grief following her death.The Boleyn family was the most ambitious dynasty of the sixteenth century, rising dramatically to prominence in the early years of a century that would end with a Boleyn on the throne.

    • ☆ The Boleyn Women: The Tudor Femmes Fatales Who Changed English History || ↠ PDF Read by Æ Elizabeth Norton
      217 Elizabeth Norton
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      Posted by:Elizabeth Norton
      Published :2020-03-10T22:21:11+00:00

    About “Elizabeth Norton”

    1. Elizabeth Norton

      Elizabeth Norton is a British historian specialising in the queens of England and the Tudor period She obtained an Master of Arts in Archaeology and Anthropology from the University of Cambridge in 2003 and a masters degree in European Archaeology from the University of Oxford in 2004.Elizabeth Norton is the author of five non fiction works She Wolves, The Notorious Queens of England The History Press, 2008 , Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII s Obsession Amberley, 2008 , Jane Seymour, Henry VIII s True Love Amberley, 2009 , Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII s Discarded Bride Amberley, 2009 and Catherine Parr Amberley, 2010 2 She is also the author of two articles Anne of Cleves and Richmond Palace Surrey History, 2009 3 and Scandinavian Influences in the Late Anglo Saxon Sculpture of Sussex Sussex Archaeological Collections, 2009

    963 thoughts on “The Boleyn Women: The Tudor Femmes Fatales Who Changed English History”

    1. Source: Free copy from Amberley for the purpose of review.Summary:Anne Boleyn is infamous as being Henry's tumultuous second wife. Her sister Mary was known as his mistress; however, what do we know of the other Boleyn women who lived in the 13th (late 1200s) through 17th centuries (1603); each with ambitions, intelligence, and leaving their own mark in history.The following women are depicted in The Boleyn Women:Alice Bracton Boleyn Anne Hoo Boleyn Anne Boleyn Heydon Margaret Butler Boleyn Eliz [...]


    2. For those interested in the family history of the women who were both born and married into the Boleyn family, this provides a good read. Unfortunately, because there is so little written history related to females of this time, much has to be deduced based on household accounts and related doings of their male relations (husbands, brothers, etc.) We are provided with an introduction to many of these women but there is little in depth to be found. It is rather scholarly inclined (lots of footnot [...]


    3. My love for Boleyn women only grew more reading Elizabeth Norton's book. As you can expect, it's about the Boleyn women, from the first one that rose to predominance in the fourteenth century to Queen Elizabeth I, and all her cousins through Mary Boleyn. It was a lighter book that I expected but it was appreciated nevertheless because I read it in less time than I usually take with historic non fiction. It was my first time reading something from Elizabeth Norton and I was not disappointed, I'll [...]


    4. Norton traces the beginnings of the Boleyn family and shows that there were quite a number of Boleyn women worthy of attention before Anne and her daughter rolled onto the scene.The problem, of course, is before Anne Boleyn was in Henry VIII’s line of sight, the Boleyn women were very much not on the scene, being very much a country family who were known and successful in their own county, but absolutely nowhere near the world stage. This means that Norton doesn’t have a lot of primary sourc [...]


    5. The story of the Boleyn women is a story of family loyalty and of ambition. Indeed. Norton traces the hunble origins of the Boleyn family and their connections, by marriage or through blood, with the de Clares, Bouchiers, Howards, Welles, and so many others from which they shared a connection with Jane Seymour's family. It is a great and emotional read about the women in this family and she presents it in such a way that you empathize with them and feel saddened at the end by their struggles and [...]


    6. If you want a book that explains the whole research and arguments on why they think someone is someone than this is the book. The narrative it's not that good in my opinion and its really easy to get confused. Too many details.


    7. Elizabeth Norton’s book is a captivating and compelling read focusing on the women of the Boleyn family from the fourteenth century to the last Boleyn women, Elizabeth I and Catherine Carey, daughter of Mary Boleyn. Norton’s book focuses upon both the women who were born into the Boleyn line and also those that became Boleyn women through marriage. Her book traces the rise of the Boleyn women, from the earliest back in the thirteenth and fourteenth century who were land owners and members of [...]


    8. This is a great book. One would ask therefore why I rated it 2 starts? Because, unfortunately it is also , in my opinion, a book for those of us who are writing maybe some kind of PhD, maybe some article. It's a little too boring for a "normal" person :(


    9. So much has been written about Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII of England, and mother of Queen Elizabeth I, in both fiction and non-fiction. In this book, Elizabeth Norton, looks at the Boleyn's from a new perspective, focusing on the women in the family, from those who were Boleyn's by birth, and including those who became Boleyn's through marriage. From humble beginnings in Norfolk in the thirteenth century, the family's prospects rose thanks to good marriages and keen ambition [...]


    10. Elizabeth Norton's "The Boleyn Women" is a study of eight generations of Boleyn women, from the first 'Anne Boleyn' who lived during the Middle Ages to the Queen Anne Boleyn's daughter, Elizabeth I.The Boleyn family first emerged in the late fourteenth century at Salle in Norfolk. Norton points out that "the family's origins were deeply unpromising and an observer in the thirteenth, fourteenth and even fifteenth century would never dreamed that the family would produce two queens of England" (p. [...]


    11. Very enjoyable. Norton sets herself the task of following the story of the Boleyn woman from humble beginnings to Queens of England in two centuries and en route gives us a glimpse into the lives of mediaeval and Tudor women in the broader sense. In an age when marriage was truly a transfer of ownership from man to man, when women were forbidden to own property and thus not allowed to make wills and were expected to be subservient to fathers, brothers and husbands, the Boleyn women who emerge fr [...]


    12. An excellent survey of the women of a family both famous and infamous. Elizabeth Norton's research into the women of the Boleyn clan is extensive and thorough, and she writes in such a way that the reader is kept interested from cover to cover.(view spoiler)[Everyone knows the story of Mary Boleyn, of Anne Boleyn and her daughter, Elizabeth I. But what about Anne Boleyn's forebearers - her mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and so on? What about Mary Boleyn's daughter, Catherine Carey (who [...]


    13. Review - This book was very well put-together. It offers a full view of the Boleyn family, particularly the women, from the first known Boleyn down through the reign of Elizabeth I. The family connections are drawn together well to create an atmosphere of family and connections which influenced the later women in the line. Norton could have done with a little more explanation of the family connections, as it did get a little confusing at times, particularly in the first few chapters where less i [...]


    14. Very interesting book about the Boleyn women and the Boleyn family in general. It could've been improved with more content actually about the women (through their diaries, letters etc.) rather than statistics/facts about them but given how much information was already in the book and the sheer scope of it I can see why this would've been a tricky challenge. The attention given to Mary Boleyn (Anne Boleyn's sister) and to Anne Boleyn's aunts was quite refreshing, as was the information about how [...]


    15. I always want to know about the ancestors of important people. This book goes up and down the Boleyn family tree, but doesn't give you more than an accounting of the many female sprouts on its branches. There is not much information that we don't already know- and I wish there was more on Elizabeth's interesting cousins Lettice and her daughter Penelope Rich.





    16. Suprisingly good. It's not just about Anne and Mary - but about thier grad-granndmothers and ants. The Boleyn women, as it appears, were really great, fiesty and progressive for the era.


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