The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education

The Liberal Arts Tradition A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three stage pattern of grammar logic and rhetoric Instead this booklet describes

  • Title: The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education
  • Author: Kevin Clark Ravi Jain
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, andThis new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, and theology The booklet also recovers the means by which classical educators developed than just intellectual virtue by means of the seven liberal arts but holistically cultivated the mind, body, will, and affections A must read for educators wanting to take a second big step toward recovering the tradition of classical education.

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      Posted by:Kevin Clark Ravi Jain
      Published :2020-09-05T00:52:55+00:00

    About “Kevin Clark Ravi Jain”

    1. Kevin Clark Ravi Jain

      Kevin Clark Ravi Jain Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education book, this is one of the most wanted Kevin Clark Ravi Jain author readers around the world.

    661 thoughts on “The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education”

    1. I can’t rate this book yet. So many people much more intelligent than I am love this book and it’s content. While it had some great things to say to me, I’m pretty sure I need to reread it to fully comprehend the entire message.


    2. I thoroughly enjoyed all the information in this book! I feel like this whole new understanding has begun to open up to me. The bibliography and footnotes have led me to add many more books to my to-read list. I’m very thankful these two men took their time to write this. More than likely I’ll not ever use this information to start or administer a Classical school, but these principles are foundational, I feel, to home educating and generally raising children.


    3. This book gave me a lot of new thoughts, particularly about music in a classical education and about situating science and history in the classical tradition.For me, it has been easier to teach philosophy, literature, history, logic, rhetoric, debate, and composition classically. I'm now inspired to equip myself to teach science and math classically.Perhaps we can inspire our students to be Euclids, Pascals, Newtons, and Einsteins!


    4. First, the positives.Clark and Jain state in the introduction that their book is extending the bridge that the contributions of Douglas Wilson's book, Case for Classical Education, and Evans and Littlejohn's book, Wisdom and Eloquence, have made toward repairing the ruins of the classical liberal arts education. I think that they have given Classical educators, whether Boards, Administrators, or Teachers, a wealth of material for reflection, integration, and probably reorientation of their class [...]


    5. Classical education has varied meanings in our culture. This book attempts to recover true classical education through the traditional liberal arts trivium and quadrivium, as well as gymnastics, music, philosophy, and theology: all rooted in piety (defined as "the proper love and fear of God and man"). Since education is the passing down of culture, how we educate our children is the lynchpin for the future. The author beautiful comments, "In conclusion, we should remember that if education is e [...]


    6. A little deep reading for this humbleHomeschooler. I did appreciate the chapters on virtue and theology, but most of the rest was a little philosophical for me.


    7. Really good. Teachers who have been immersed in the Classical education movement in the past 15 years will very much appreciate what the authors have to share here.


    8. The challenges which this little bombshell presents to our approaches to school and church are immense. So timely. Intended for school, applications to church need to follow.


    9. I really, really, really wanted to like this book, and while I found the discussion of the history of classical education fascinating, I felt like the book was too much theory for theory's sake. Also, since the author's are professional classical educators, I found that sometimes their pleas to include such and such in the curriculum or school culture made me feel like I wasn't doing enough, until I realized that it's already integrated with home life and not needed as a separate add on. (Homesc [...]


    10. Fantastic. For anyone wanting to get familiar with the Christian classical tradition, this would be my top recommended book. The authors lay out and define numerous key terms and discuss them in through detail. Some of the discussions in the main text and in footnotes may be too complex for newcomers to the tradition, but this remains an excellent introductory and intermediate resource. Those coming into the tradition by way of Dorothy Sayers or ACCS can also greatly benefit from the historical [...]


    11. 4.5 stars. An excellent overview of what it means to be classically educated for those looking for something beyond just the trivium. Clark and Jain do an excellent job of framing the seven liberal arts within a full framework that includes piety, gymnastic, music, philosophy, and theology. My only (very minor) issue with this book is that the authors sometimes seem to write in slightly more complicated language than is necessary.


    12. Thoughtful look This is an extremely thorough and thoughtful dive into the classical Christian school movement. I enjoy the specificity of the authors explanations.



    13. I wrote the following awhile back, and it has been published on the back cover of this book.Some of us, after having immersed ourselves in the Trivium, thanks to Dorothy Sayers's essay and many other wonderful resources, have found ourselves wondering, What else? We know there are seven liberal arts, including the Quadrivium, and we don't know exactly what to do with these other four, where to go next. Clark and Jain's The Liberal Arts Tradition has the answers, and provides them in a clear, con [...]


    14. Own.I had high hopes for The Liberal Arts Tradition and Clark and Jain did not disappoint.I loved the way they made education - paideia - part of an integrated Christian life rooted in piety and fed by music and the gymnastic. The paradigm of Wonder leading to Worship leading to Work leading to Wisdom is one that can be used in all of life. The chapter on Theology is a masterpiece helping me see how Theology, the queen of sciences, undergirds and forms all other elements of education.This is a b [...]


    15. This book was excellent. Too many in the classical Christian movement believe that the "classical" model contained nothing more than the seven liberal arts or even simply the Trivium. Clark and Jain do an excellent job correcting such a view. Their "PGMAPT" paradigm is a much more holistic and comprehensive model of the medieval curriculum that emphasizes certain aspects often neglected by proponents of classical Christian education (aspects such as gymnastics and philosophy, for example). Addit [...]


    16. Good book, though more intellectual than practical. Gives a solid review of the basis and need for a Christian classical education with extensive footnotes and bibliography, but doesn't cover the nuts and bolts of everyday execution. Would like to read again and discuss with others as I think it would help in grasping more of the salient points and figuring out how it plays out in real life. If you are looking for a crash course in Classical education philosophy, then this is your book.


    17. Excellent little work. Reflection about the nature and purpose of classical Christian education is really starting to come into its own, and is beginning to take on a serenity borne of reflection and experience. Clark and Jain do a great job in drawing on multiple streams of thought (from IPH'ers like Senior and Taylor, to the School of Sayers and Van Tillians like Frame, to Brits like Caldecott) and mixing them into a great conversation.


    18. This is a good read on classical education. It isn't as dense as "Climbing Parnassas" so it may enjoy a wider audience. It takes up the "modern mantle" of classical education in a manner that is less caustic or arrogant as the writings of Douglas Wilson. I would recommend it highly to those who would like to learn more about the classical education movement.


    19. This is an excellent look at why we do what we do in classical education. I highly recommend it. Do not miss the chart in Appendix V, which serves as a most helpful visual summary of the principles fleshed out in the book.


    20. Informative introduction and review of the larger historical and philosophical context for the modern Christian appropriation of the classic education paradigm. It also contains many good references for further reading.



    21. Highly profitable summation of the Christian classical approach to education. Extensive footnotes throughout will have you wanting to expand your library in lots of directions.



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