Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan

Peasants Rebels and Outcastes The Underside of Modern Japan Using diaries memoirs fiction trial testimony personal recollections and eyewitness accounts Mikiso Hane weaves a fascinating tale of what it was like to be an ordinary Japanese during this last

  • Title: Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan
  • Author: Mikiso Hane
  • ISBN: 9780394710402
  • Page: 385
  • Format: Paperback
  • Using diaries, memoirs, fiction, trial testimony, personal recollections, and eyewitness accounts, Mikiso Hane weaves a fascinating tale of what it was like to be an ordinary Japanese during this last century of startling economic growth Rescuing vivid, often wrenching accounts of peasants, miners, textile workers, rebels, and prostitutes, he forces us to see Japan s modUsing diaries, memoirs, fiction, trial testimony, personal recollections, and eyewitness accounts, Mikiso Hane weaves a fascinating tale of what it was like to be an ordinary Japanese during this last century of startling economic growth Rescuing vivid, often wrenching accounts of peasants, miners, textile workers, rebels, and prostitutes, he forces us to see Japan s modern century from the beginnings of contact with the West to defeat in World War II through fresh eyes In doing so, he presents a formidable challenge to the success story of Japan s economic miracle.

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      Posted by:Mikiso Hane
      Published :2020-04-18T00:55:40+00:00

    About “Mikiso Hane”

    1. Mikiso Hane

      Mikiso Hane Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan book, this is one of the most wanted Mikiso Hane author readers around the world.

    443 thoughts on “Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan”

    1. Like, as a corrective to hella-orientalist narratives w/r/t Japan and development in the pre-war era this is a really good and interesting book only it seems content to just say "these are things" rather than actually develop an argument per se. By which i mean there are often claims about for example (fractured agrarian labor organizing between Anarchism, Marxism, Christian sorta socialist orientations and Right Wing Nationalism) but Hane never really delves into *why* different things were com [...]


    2. Reluctantly, I wasn’t sure if I could enjoy reading this nine-chapter book, “Peasants, Rebels, and Outcastes: The Underside of Modern Japan” by Professor Mikiso Hane since it looked a bit highly-academic with innumerable references. However, I gradually found the author’s style of narrative amazingly enriched by citing data/information from related various sources, that is, “… diaries, memoirs, fiction, trial testimony, personal recollections, and eyewitness accounts” (back cover); [...]


    3. Excellent. The rural population was subject to famines, starvation, diseases, and pretty much accepted their status in life. Meiji restoration was really only good for people living in the cities. My grandmother Aiko hit the education sweet spot growing up in Tokyo. When she started school only 30% of the females attended school. By the time she graduated 97% were attending school. There was no education for rural children. Thank you Dr. Hane for writing this and your other books.Found it intere [...]


    4. The book doesn't say anything. It's a reference to events post-tokugawa era to WW2. It's full of translated descriptions of peoples experiences. I found it informative, but not overly interesting. It's probably of more interest if you're writing some gritty fiction or want to round out the underside of your next D&d campaign or, you know, just want to here the variety of ways people can suffer.That aside - it's important to read about this stuff This is what happens when a people do not have [...]



    5. This is mainly a reference book, but fascinating how it documents the advent of Japanese society through some tulmutous times. It does help to have a love for Japan and its traditions, customs, and art. I mainly picked it up intially because it had several pages mentioning writer Yukio Mishima. Later, I kept reading it to gain some more knowledge of his world and the politics of his time. Can't say I'm an expert after reading this, but I do have a better understanding.


    6. Hane's main question is: “What did the process of modernization mean to the vast majority of the population? How did modernization affect the lives of the people who carried its burden and paid its costs?"I appreciate her concern for how the other half lives, but feel that she is not sufficiently critical of the promise of modernity, preferring to envision it as merely unfulfilled, rather than unfulfillable.


    7. Subalterns in the Japanese context. Interesting long quotes from diaries and memoirs. Each chapter is coherently (and somewhat in a reductionist way) organized, so it might be good for assigning in an undergrad class and let them deconstruct the author's narrative.


    8. Stellar historiography. Aside from the chapter "Women Rebels" (which was just one massive Itou Noe quote), fascinatingly and engagingly written. A valid addition to the bookshelf of any amateur historian.


    9. Good for those interested in non-Western history. An easy read for a history book. New information is always intriguing.





    10. It was interesting although a bit tedious at times. The author was justified in her outrage but at times it got a little tiring.


    11. Industrialization in Japan was rough - Hane batters you with anecdote after anecdote, but lacks any real argument beyond the compendium of tragic and dark stories


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