K.

K From the internationally acclaimed author of The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony comes one of the most significant books in recent years on a writer of perennial interest a virtuoso interpretation of t

  • Title: K.
  • Author: Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock
  • ISBN: 9781400076123
  • Page: 207
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the internationally acclaimed author of The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony comes one of the most significant books in recent years on a writer of perennial interest a virtuoso interpretation of the work of Franz Kafka.What are Kafka s fictions about Are they dreams Allegories Symbols Countless answers have been offered, but the essential mystery remains intact SeFrom the internationally acclaimed author of The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony comes one of the most significant books in recent years on a writer of perennial interest a virtuoso interpretation of the work of Franz Kafka.What are Kafka s fictions about Are they dreams Allegories Symbols Countless answers have been offered, but the essential mystery remains intact Setting out on his own exploration, Roberto Calasso enters the flow, the tortuous movement, the physiology of Kafka s work to discover why K and Josef K the protagonists of The Castle and The Trial are so radically different from any other character in the history of the novel, and to determine who, in the end, is K The culmination of Calasso s lifelong fascination with Kafka s work, K is also an unprecedented consideration of the mystery of Kafka himself.

    • Ó K. || á PDF Read by Ù Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock
      207 Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock
    • thumbnail Title: Ó K. || á PDF Read by Ù Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock
      Posted by:Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock
      Published :2020-011-11T19:19:55+00:00

    About “Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock”

    1. Roberto Calasso Geoffrey Brock

      Roberto Calasso born 30 May 1941 in Florence is an Italian publisher and writer He was born into a family of the local upper class, well connected with some of the great Italian intellectuals of their time His maternal grandfather Giovanni Codignola was a professor of philosophy at Florence University Codignola created a new publishing house called La Nuova Italia, in Florence, just like his friend Benedetto Croce had done in Bari with Laterza His uncle Tristano Codignola, partigiano during the Resistenza, after the war joined the political life of the new republic, and was for a while Minister of Education His mother Melisenda who gave up a promising academic career to raise her three children was a scholar of German literature, and had worked on H lderlin s translations of the Greek poet Pindar His father Francesco was a law professor, first at Florence University and then in Rome, where he eventually became dean of his faculty He has been working for Adelphi Edizioni since its founding in 1962 and became its Chairman in 1999 His books have from 1990 been translated into most European languages After a successful career in publishing he has become a leading intellectual citation needed He is the author of a work in progress, that started with The Ruin of Kasch in 1983, a book welcome by Italo Calvino, dedicated to the French statesman Talleyrand and to a reflection on the culture of modernity This was followed in 1988 by The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony, a book where the tale of Cadmus and his wife Harmonia becomes a pretext for re writing the great tales of Greek mythology and reflect on the reception of Greek culture for a contemporary readership The trend for portraying whole civilizations continues with Ka where the subject of the re writing is Hindu mythology K instead restricts the focus to one single author Franz Kafka this trend continues with Il rosa Tiepolo, inspired by an adjective used by Proust to describe a shade of pink used by Tiepolo in his paintings With his latest book, La folie Baudelaire, Calasso goes back to the fresco of whole civilisations, this time re writing the lives and works of the artists that revolutionised our artistic taste, the symbolist poets and impressionist painters.His essaystic production is collected in a few books I quarantanove gradini The Forty nine Steps, a collection of essays about major authors and thinkers in European modernity addressed to Pierre Klossowski and his wife His Oxford lessons are collected in Literature and the Gods In 2005 Calasso published La follia che viene dalle ninfe, a collection of essays on the influence of the nymph in literature, which is discussed through authors ranging from Plato to Nabokov.

    530 thoughts on “K.”

    1. Sarà perché da quando li ho letti li ho posti subito al vertice della classifica dei miei romanzi preferiti degli ultimi due secoli. Sarà perché fin da allora mi chiedo il perché, ma ancora non ho trovato una risposta certa. Sarà perché Calasso con questo libro qualche risposta me la dà, ma mi suscita anche altre e nuove domande, ancora più profonde riguardo a Kafka, sulle quali continuare a interrogarmi.Sarà per questo, e per altre ragioni ancora (non ultima quella che Calasso scrive [...]


    2. Kafka va inteso nella «bellezza sommata a pietà» (Nabokov).Il corteggiamento convenzionale nella narrativa di Kafka è pressoché inesistente, le donne si concedono agli uomini in modo spiazzante, vessando, essendo vessate, vessandosi. Le pagine di Kafka emanano un eros comicamente tumultuoso. Scrive Roberto Calasso in K: «Frieda, Pepi, Olga, Leni: questi essere femminili bisillabici, subalterni, erotici sono gli unici interlocutori con i quali K. e Josef K. parlano come se parlassero con se [...]


    3. Kafka can't be understood if he isn't taken literally.It took me 10 years to finish this short book. For some reason I was generally satisfied with a few pages, something that easily happens with Calasso's writing, always astonishing in its erudition even when it seems to glide across the page. K. is less a commentary than a meditation on what Kafka called "the indestructible."This word brings to mind the Vedic akshara more than it does any term used in less remote traditions. Kafka never chose [...]


    4. I had read Calasso's Ka and Kafka's Der Process before I slogged through K Is this book more of a sequel to the former or the latter? I would have to say I don't know. But it's weird to use the Vedas to read modernist literature, isn't it?I've never been enthralled with Kafka. Too German. Too much like a succession of cloudy days. Too much like modern times. Too much Max Weber's iron cage transmogrified onto page.But now I must admit I've developed a soft spot for the guy! (Just don't throw an a [...]


    5. warning! for kafka lovers only. this dense literary criticism tries to figure out who was 'k'. all the 'k's' too: K. and Josef K. and Kafka with the kapital k. after a hard slog through, i kannot really say if kalasso really answered his kuestion.


    6. About two or three chapters in so far, and I can confirm that this is decidedly a book about Kafka (some other readers expressed surprise on this point) and more specifically about two of Novels. But that is exectly what I was expecting. Kafka is particularly well-suited to Calasso's trippy mythopoeic form of analysis. It helps to have read The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony and The Ruin of Kasch, also by Calasso. I have a strong feeling that it would also help to have read Ka. But I haven't. I [...]


    7. An insightful look into Kafka's work that concentrates mostly on The Castle and The Trial but also looks at his other works and draws quite extensively on his diaries and letters. Calasso has an aphoristic style and can be a little obtuse at times, but he quotes liberally from the work and gave me some interesting ways to consider Kafka's work that I hadn't considered before. I read this for the Kafka subject matter but I'm keen to read more by Calasso.




    8. A fittingly erudite work on the great mystery that is Kafka in his many forms. One must have, at least, a working knowledge of Kafka's Trial, Castle and the more important of his shorter works (In the Penal Colony and Metamorphosis) to participate with this text. Calasso's analysis is dense and largely well-formed though, for me, it could have been better served with a larger dollop of biography.While reading this I realized that I would rather Kafka's work retain the sense of a puzzle that one [...]


    9. Può un testo di critica letteraria - definizione assai invalidante in questo caso specifico - raggiungere le vette sulle quali poggiano, inamovibili, le opere di un autore come Kafka ? Quesito che probabilmente non accetta risposte. Ma ciò non nega che l'acume con cui Calasso ha trattato e interpretato il labirintico intreccio di simboli che penetrano l'intera opera kafkiana, fa di questo scritto un testamento interpretativo nel quale ogni ambiguità è disvelata senza imposizioni di vedute, b [...]


    10. "Essere prescelti, essere condannati: due modalità dello stesso procedimento." (p. 16)"Il puro passare del tempo è il giudizio." (p. 22)


    11. Makes more sense of Kafka than any other critic I've read, though I must admit I found the perspectives of The Trial more compelling than The Castle, maybe because I've always found The Castle more incomplete, a proto-draft that may give us glimpses into Kafka's material and process but too raw and sloppy to be definite. The Trial, however, is such a classic that this attention proves wonderful. But even more so, Calasso's insights into Kafka's writing process are what stunned me here. Kafka's w [...]



    12. Una exégesis "rara" de la obra kafkiana. No me convenció el fondo aunque la forma es correcta. Libro a veces incomprensible si bien lleno de amor y erudición por Kafka.



    13. Wish I could give this one a 3.75. Wasn't nearly as good as The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony, but Calasso really does have a fantastic way with words.




    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *